Cannes: Jane Campion addresses sexism in film

All you privileged men who just don’t get this. At one time you wouldn’t give us the vote. Forget about working or an Olympic sport. Women just can’t play tennis so they don’t deserve the same pay as men. Women are stupid and don’t have the same brain capacity as men. Women should not be doing any job which is traditionally held by men. Women are the weaker sex. They can’t manage the same job as men. Women won’t be hired because one day they will get married and have children. Hollywood is perhaps one of the most old fashioned industries in the world. It does not reflect the lives of women. Stories about men, by men, fantasies by men of women who are beautiful, just wives or girlfriends and certainly not doing the same job as men. Hollywood promotes fantasy while living in a fantasy world where women are second. And Hollywood, time and time again, promotes the lie that no one is interested in a female POV. Men – you don’t know how privileged you are. I hear of so many amazing stories about strong women over the past decades – true stories about real girls and women – the courage, the tenacity, the power – yet these stories don’t get made because you carry on the propaganda that says that men are the heroes – Batman, Superman, Spiderman – and girls and women are the pretty, plain, mother or whore. Look around where you work and where you live. Do you see weak women? Are your sisters, mothers, girlfriends, wives, women friends – all just weak little sexual things who just want to get married and can’t do anything without a man? We fight, we are heroes, we travel the world, we create – we are real. We want our stories. We want them, not for selfish Hollywood reason to make $$$$, but to show girls and women out there that life doesn’t belong to men. Men are part of it and are amazing, no one is disputing that, what we are fighting for is our stories to be told. How can 52% of the population be treated like 3% of the population? The reason why black actors and filmmakers couldn’t get on the industry was because of racism. Everyone agrees with that. Now men don’t see that with women that the only reason we don’t have more than two female directors at Cannes is down to sexism and not, as is often stated by idiot men, that we just aren’t good enough – we don’t have the balls to be a director. There was a time when women were not allowed to run a marathon. 2014 – and nothing has changed.

 

Ginger Liu

http://www.gliumedia.com

Star Wars new casting mistake

The new Star Wars filmmakers announced their casting yesterday and it’s perhaps no surprise, with J.J. Abrams at the helm, that there is just one female actress and six males. Why does Hollywood not want 100% of the population’s money? Why do they just want 48% – the males? It just doesn’t make any business sense.

We girls loved the original Star Wars film back in the 1970’s – but now we are in 2014. Have a few more women in this movie and then it opens out with media coverage to women’s media, publications, blogs, girl fans. Women blogs are the biggest in the world, bigger than men. That’s twice the publicity, twice the ticket sales. It’s just bad business sense – again. So the only reasons I can think of for their decision is plain old fashioned sexism or Star Wars is a gay movie. Which is it?

Why alienate 52% of the population? Why not make a film that sells tickets to everyone? Why is Harry Potter such a big franchise? Girls love the female lead. I loved Star Wars because I could dream of being a Princess in outer space. Time and time again, Hollywood producers shut out half the population. Oh sure, the new Star Wars will do well. It would do twice as well if young girls could watch it too.

This is plain old fashioned sexism. What other reason could there be to not want to market to an additional 52% of the population?

I feel let down again by Hollywood. I have to pinch myself every time this happens. Am I really living in the 21st century or is it thirty years ago when I was first getting into contemporary films and feeling starved of female protagonists? What’s changed?

Don’t bother to argue with me if you’re a white male and you can’t see what the fuss is all about. Lucky for you to be born at the top of the pyramid. May I remind you that women are not a minority. Why treat us this way in Hollywood? Don’t you think that little girls and grown up women want to see ourselves having an adventure in space, just like the boys? We are not sex objects, or just the girlfriend, the wife, mother or whore.

Girls just wanna have fun.

Better rewrite that script!

Ginger Liu

Facebook – the new existential question

Being on Facebook is a little comfort for those who don’t feel they exist. It’s like a star who has to be in the news – have their 15 minutes – in order to feel that they exist in the world. Facebook is a little like that. Say hi to people we do and don’t really know. We exist…or do we? It’s a little like being up in the sky on a spaceship. What comfort would they have that they exist, that they are wanted, missed, loved…start typing…say hello, we are here……….. Is this the new existential question? “I am on Facebook, therefore I am.”

Happy Easter everyone!

Isn’t this supposed to be a holiday weekend where I do nothing except stuff myself with chocolate eggs? As a kid I think I enjoyed Easter more because on Sunday morning at the breakfast table there was always an egg tray of six Cadbury’s Cream eggs and a large Cadbury hollow egg plus a bag of mini eggs from the Swiss – Suchard or Lindt – now you’re talking. Why does good chocolate make you go “ohhhhhhhhhh.” Heaven. And then because it was the Easter holidays and no school for two weeks, I’d be eating chocolate at breakfast, noon and night and it didn’t matter.

Diane Arbus exhibition at the Jewish Museum

iane Arbus is one of the most prolific photographers of the 20th century and a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New Yorkfeatures one of her most famous images of “Jewish giant” Eddie Carmel. Arbus wasn’t afraid to follow her own creative path and produce the work that interested her.

Masterpieces & Curiosities:

Diane Arbus’s Jewish Giant

April 11 – August 3, 2014

New York’s Jewish Museum.

http://bit.ly/1hvYjEx

Andy Summers “Del Mondo” photography exhibition at Leica Los Angeles

Shanghai-May-2013--e1383486052756

Shanghai. May 2012. (c) Andy Summers

Andy Summers shared a love for both music and photography from as early as the late 1970s. As the guitarist in one of the biggest bands of the 20th century – The Police – his photography became an extension of his music.

While the band toured the world, Summers documented behind the scenes, giving an intimate, personal and unique point of view that could not be captured by hired press. Much later, after The Police stopped touring and stopped making music as a band, Summers produced with Taschen (2007) “I’ll Be Watching You: Inside The Police 1980-1983.” His first photography book of the band and their travels was “Throb” (William Morrow & Company, 1983), currently out of print. Since the band’s demise, Summers has been productive in both solo music projects and photography, the latter of which has extended his art to numerous exhibitions, magazine essays, photography publications and recently, keynote presentations of his work.

For his exhibition at Leica Los Angeles, Summers presents his global travels through a series of striking black and white portraits. You won’t find any images of music in this project, instead we see people and places and gritty raw realities of people’s lives in many parts of Asia.

I spoke to Andy about his upcoming exhibition in Los Angeles, his use of Leica and his photographic process.

GL: Tell me about your upcoming exhibition at Leica Gallery Los Angeles and what we can expect to see?

AS: I am pleased to be exhibiting at the new Leica gallery in LA, as I have been a Leica photographer for many years now. Therefore, to show in the new and first Leica gallery in LA is a distinct pleasure and seems fitting. All the photos in the show are shot with Leica and will be a selection from around the world in the last few years.

GL: When did your love affair with photography, and in particular Leica, begin?

AS: My true pursuit of photography began in the early eighties. I used a Reflex cameras as I started out but switched to the Leica Rangefinder a couple of years later when introduced to it by Ralph Gibson.

GL: From the images I’ve seen in this exhibition, people feature in many of them. Is this a conscious point of view?

AS: There is no conscious shooting of people; it would depend on the situation and if it ignites something in me.

GL: What is your method in setting up an image? Is it a fleeting visit and taking photographs of what you see, and/or do you enter into dialogue with your subject for background information?

AS: It can be both. The real preparation is the effort that one puts into developing photography skills over the years, or seeing photographic possibilities as part of some larger progression.

GL: Which city, town or country has been your most inspiring place to photograph so far?

AS: The inspiration for a photograph is not tied to one town or city, but rather something could be anywhere that grabs one’s visual imagination.

GL: Which photographers have and still do inspire you?

AS: Ralph Gibson, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, Henri Cartier Bresson.

GL: From your upcoming exhibition in Los Angeles, can you choose an image to describe its subject matter and creative process?

AS: I wouldn’t pick out one; rather I would say that they are all facets of the process. First being in a situation that is visually stimulating and that may involve shooting rapidly or waiting for a scene to develop visually, i.e., the shapes become better inside the frame, the light improves or whatever it is that you recognize as more compelling.

GL: What more can we expect to see from your photography in 2014?

AS: No doubt I will travel with my Leica monochromatic and see what comes up…more images from China, probably.

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“Andy Summers – Del Mondo” opens at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles with an opening reception on November 9, 2013 from 6pm – 8pm and the exhibition runs to January 4, 2014. Andy Summers will present an artist talk on December 14 at 6pm.

Leica Gallery Los Angeles
8783 Beverly Blvd.
West Hollywood CA 90048

See also: www.andysummers.com

About the interviewer:

Ginger Liu is a contributing editor to Ragazine.CC. You can read more about her in “About Us.”